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 Traces chirugicales en archéo- Désert du tarim- âge bronze

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yrwanel
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Messages : 305
Date d'inscription : 04/11/2009
Age : 64
Localisation : Bruxelles

MessageSujet: Traces chirugicales en archéo- Désert du tarim- âge bronze   Dim 29 Nov - 21:22

"The earliest Tarim mummies, found at Qäwrighul and dated to 1800 BCE, are of a Caucasoid physical type whose closest affiliation is to the Bronze Age populations of southern Siberia, Kazakhstan, Central Asia, and the Lower Volga.[2]:237
The cemetery at Yanbulaq contained 29 mummies which date from 1100–500 BCE, 21 of which are Mongoloid—the earliest Mongoloid mummies found in the Tarim basin—and 8 of which are of the same Caucasoid physical type found at Qäwrighul.[2]:237
Notable mummies are the tall, red-haired "Chärchän man" or the
"Ur-David" (1000 BCE); his son (1000 BCE), a small 1-year-old baby with
blond hair protruding from under a red and blue felt cap, and blue
stones in place of the eyes; the "Hami Mummy" (c. 1400–800 BCE),
a "red-headed beauty" found in Qizilchoqa; and the "Witches of Subeshi"
(4th or 3rd century BCE), who wore two foot long black felt conical
hats with a flat brim.[3]
Also found at Subeshi was a man with traces of a surgical operation on
his neck; the incision is sewn up with sutures made of horsehair.
Surgery was considered heretical in ancient Chinese medical tradition
.[4]"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarim_Mummies

(le textile mène à tout!)
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yrwanel
Kouros
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Messages : 305
Date d'inscription : 04/11/2009
Age : 64
Localisation : Bruxelles

MessageSujet: Re: Traces chirugicales en archéo- Désert du tarim- âge bronze   Dim 29 Nov - 21:28

"Subashi lies a good distance from Qizilchoqa, and its site is at least
seven centuries younger, yet the bodies and their clothing are
strikingly similar. In addition to the "witch's hat," clothing found
there included fur coats and leather mittens; the Subashi women also
held bags containing small knives and herbs, probably for use as
medicines. A typical Subashi man, said by the Chinese team to be at
least 55 years old, was found lying next to the corpse of a woman in a
shallow burial chamber. He wore a sheepskin coat, felt hat, and long
sheepskin boots fastened at the crotch with a belt.

Another
Subashi man has traces of a surgical operation on his neck; the
incision is sewn up with sutures made of horsehair. Mair was
particularly struck by this discovery because he knew of a Chinese text
from the third century A.D. describing the life of Huatuo, a doctor
whose exceptional skills were said to have included the extraction and
repair of diseased organs. The text also claims that before surgery,
patients drank a mixture of wine and an anesthetizing powder that was
possibly derived from opium. Huatuo's story is all the more remarkable
in that the notion of surgery was heretical to ancient Chinese medical
tradition, which taught that good health depended on the balance and
flow of natural forces throughout the body. Mair wonders if the Huatuo
legend might relate to some lost Asian medical tradition practiced by
the Xinjiang people. One clue is that the name Huatuo is uncommon in
China and seems close to the Sanskrit word for medicine."


http://discovermagazine.com/1994/apr/themummiesofxinj359/
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